Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Dr. CHARLES RYERSON .. AN OBITUARY




*



Prof. Dr. Charles Ryerson or "Charlie" as he is known in friends circle came first to The American College as an Oberlin Rep during the very early days of the program. If I remember correct he is the fourth rep after Joe Elder, Dav Gallup and Dav Lockwood. Those days the Oberlin Building did not exist and the reps used Coe Lodge as their residence along with a few faculty members of the College. I had finished my graduation by that time and I had left Madurai. So I did not have any interaction with him when he was a Oberlin rep. He was probably used as a tutor in the English Department like Gallup and others were.

However Charlie had developed a love for people of Madurai and their religion. These interests brought him back to Madurai many times after his first visit and I had ample opportunities to know him. He knew more about the Meenakshi temple and other smaller and rural temples in and around Madurai than many in Madurai. He could talk on Chitra festival giving lot of background about the practices of people of villages participating in it. Bicycle was his favorite vehicle in those days and one could see him anywhere in Madurai riding on his bicycle.

He had many other interests and had motivated a few in USA to go over to India for studies and research. One such person associated with Charlie that I know of had spent lot of time on research about the Nadar community particularly their "uravin murai" practices that had helped the development of the community.

His another interest was Politics. At one time he was an authority on the DMK movement. He had such a good contact with DMK hierarchy that he could walk into Chief Minister Mr. Karunanidhi's office. Sometimes his visits coincided with general elections in the country probably because of his interest in political trends of our country.

He was Professor of Theology in Princeton. Though I had not been to his office some of my friends have told me that he had a picture of Meenakshi temple that I had given him was fixed on the wall in his office. The picture, a rare one, shot from helicopter flying over the temple taken by a great photographer of Madurai, Mr. Christopher.

He is one of my friends from USA who had visited my home a few times and enjoyed the hospitality of my mother. On one Chitra Pournami day we had a moon light supper in my home Charlie and another Oberlin Rep Dennis Hudson and one or more friends were there we enjoyed the evening looking at the fire works of the Alagar festival at a distance from the open terrace of my house. A meeting I can never forget.

May his soul rest in peace.

******
P.S.
Dear Dharumi,
News is in hand that Prof. Dr. Charles Ryerson is no more. Suriakumar drew my attention to the news. After I got the news Prof. Samuel Lawrence called me over phone and asked me whether I could write a note on Charlie for the website you are maintaining. There are many who could do a better job. Yet I have decided to respond to our Lawrence. You may include it in the save American college website if you think it will be of any use there.     V.SRINIVASAN
Tthank you, V.S. ji.   .... தருமி


Friday, June 17, 2016

LET US ALL REMEMBER THEM ............





*

Dear Prof.V.S.,

I appreciate your vast memory of our campus

I appreciate for bringing out so many important names of our campus.

I very much appreciate for bringing the history of our college through this article.

It reminds me that so many who served / worked / studied in this campus loved the college so much dearly and passionately in its long run. 

Long live the college.(though it has lost its glamour now, that's what i personally feel.)

.with lovely memories of my life in the campus.........Dharumi

*


Many buildings in American College have names named after persons associated with the College. Washburn Hall, Wallace Hall, Zumbro Hall are named after first three Principals of the College. Binghamton Hall named after the parish that contributed money to build that building in memory of Principal Zumbro . James Hall named after the donor Ellen M James. Only building named after a lady as on date. Dudley Hall, Stoffer Hall, Daniel Poor Memorial Library, Jubilee Chapel, Flint House. Oberlin Shansi building are other buildings that carry their respective name each with a special reason.

Recently the Principal of the College has given the name Paul Love Hall to the new building behind Oberlin Shansi building and Richard P Riesz Hall for the hostel of Jeevana Jyothi program. This obscure building not easily visible to many visitors of the College is located behind James Hall..

Why not use this occasion to name the other nameless buildings in the College?.

Professor James M Hess a missionary of the mission that founded the college was a Professor of English for many years, a great teacher. It seems he and his wife used to appear in costumes and enact the different scenes of Shakespeare's plays as he was teaching the plays. He retired in 1952. His name will be very appropriate for the building now known as centenary hall that houses the P G English Department at present.

Professor Lockwood a Professor of Mathematics had served the College died in Madurai. One of his sons was an Oberlin rep for a few years and another  son was associated with the College as a member of the Governing Council for many years. The building that now houses Mathematics department could be given his name. His portrait used to exist in that department for several years.

Rev Telfer Mook was associated with the parent mission was responsible for the transfer of some funds off the College from USA to India using which the shops and offices in front of the College were built. His name could be appropriate for that building that is a constant source of income for the College. The Indian Bank building could be named after another missionary Rev Paul R Dettman, a Bursar of the College for many years.

Miss A J Moses was the only lady lecturer/professor in the College for several years. In the early days of her service that was a requirement of the University that there should be at least one lady staff when there were lady students. She was also the warden of the women's' hostel of the College for many years. That building could be appropriately named A J Moses Hall

The College auditorium has an interesting history. It was a building built with a government grant with the agreement that part of the labor for construction to be from voluntary labor of Staff and Students of the College. The building was achieved amidst some discomfort. When the building was completed the them famous actor Sivaji Ganesan was invited to open that building. He did it and promised a lump some grant towards the construction. That however did not happen. The Auditorium that was to be named after him remained auditorium only. Our Professor Vasanthan well known dramatist had staged many plays in the Auditorium. He is a great teacher of Shakespeare as well. Will not Vasanthan's name be appropriate for Auditorium?

There is abuilding known as NRSC (Non resident Student Center) that houses Tamil department. Prof. Karmega Konar was a legendary professor of Tamil of the College for many years. Will not his name appropriate for that building?

The Humanities Hall has a history. It was built immediately after the second World War. Cement and Steel were scarce commodities. Yet the building was successfully built with Professor Ranjitham's contacts in Madras Government of those days and some donations raised locally and acknowledged with tablets in each room. There were a few attempts made to name the Hall after Ranjitham. But it was not acceptable due to some politics of those days. Ranjitham was a great nationalist. He supported the students of American College joning the freedom movement in the pre independence days. Can we not honor that building by naming it Ranjithaam Hall as a tribute to the great leader (congress man) of those days?

The indoor games building also could have a name. I would suggest the name of the first Physical Director of the College who retired as Professor of Physical Education -  . John Santiago Edward.

I will be happiest man is the PG Physica Annex is named after Dr. R P Riesz. 

Thanks a lot for your patience. 

Srinivasan 




*

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

IS IT ENOUGH ?





*


Is it enough?

- I think it isn’t. Please read the following document and respond.


The administration of The American College, Madurai has recently given a name to a building that has been in existence for a few years. That building will from now on be known as Richard P Riesz Hall. It was built in the space between the James Hall and the southern compound wall of the college as hostel for the residents of a program called Jeevan Jyothi . The building will not be easily visible to anyone who walks through the campus unless one enters the central corridor of James Hall. The JJ program was created by Dr. Riesz through his efforts and financial aid from an external Church related agency to give persons with disabilities computer education and training to make them employable. No doubt it is an honor to Prof. R P Riesz the building is given his name. Probably this is the first time in the history of the College a building has been named after a living person. There rise a question. Does this honor Dr R P Riesz’s work in the College adequately? A related question does this program exist at present? Is the building used at present? I was there on 30th April this year and there was no visible indication that it was in use.


Dr. Riesz had served the College as the Professor and Head of the Post Graduate Physics Department for nearly three decades. He was responsible for creating the department and for all the improvements made in Physics Education in the College, in the Madurai Kamaraj University and the impact made in other parts of the country as well. If the intention of the College is to honor Dr. Riesz t it should be more for his work for betterment of Physics Education and the College should have given his name to the P G Physics annex of James Hall. One should also remember the pioneering work he had done as Dean of Academic Affairs of the College during the early years of College Autonomy.


Let us look back into the history of P G Physics Annex. For a long time post graduate education in Sciences was confined to larger cities like Chennai. During the second five year plan period the Government of India had decided to extend post graduate education to smaller cities like Madurai and offered liberal grants. The College took advantage of this and got the PG Chemistry and PG Zoology program and the building now known as Stoffer Hall was built.


 When the College was ready to start PG Physics the second five year plan period was over and the country had entered the third five year plan period. During this period the grant for buildings was reduced and the College had to economize on the building. So instead of an independent PG Physics building it was decided to build an annex for the James sharing the stair way of James Hall and connecting the two buildings in the first floor through what is known as the Japanese bridge, a new idea at that time so that the college could start PG Physics with the reduced grants. Cutting out the usual verandah spaces found in all the other buildings in the college also helped. Dr. Riesz came as a missionary supported by the parent mission in USA that had founded the College. The annex was expanded to include workshops and research spaces with a different government grant..


I think the PG Physics annex with all the additions made to that building should be called Richard P Riesz Hall. Where to write the new name could be raised by some persons. On the Japanese bridge of course will be my answer. The name of Applied Science is written there at present. Removing that name and writing the new name in that place will not be objected by any one. The DAS also has ceased to exist.

If you feel I am correct please forward this letter to the Principal of the college with a strong recommendation that Dr. Riesz’s name should be associated with PG Physics annex also. Also please send the mail to all P G Physics students and friends of the college you may know and request them also to do the same. Thanks.

V. Srinivasan, Student of the college 1951-55, Lecturer in Physics 1959-74, Head of UG Physics Department 1974-88, Head PG Physics Department 1988-94, remaining as a friend of the college after retirement now settled in Thane, Maharashtra


14/52 Vijay Vilas, G B Road, Thane West 400615,
  srinivasan1936@dataone.in  Mobile 9819595097. 

Mail address of American College americancollege@eth.net 
 Phone 0452 2530070.


*

Sunday, May 22, 2016

THANK YOU, MY BOYS





*




 1985-88 ஆண்டு மாணவர்கள் இன்று (22.06.2016) கல்லூரியில் ஒன்று கூடுகிறார்கள்ஆசிரியர்களுக்கும் அழைப்பு உண்டுஆனால் என்னை அழைத்த போது கல்லூரிக்குள் நான் நுழைய தடை விதிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது என்பதைக் கூறினேன். (தடைக்கான காரணம் -- இங்கே. )



 


இருந்தும் நேரில் பார்க்க விரும்பினார்கள் இருவர் வீட்டு முகவரி கேட்டு இரு நாட்களுக்கு முன்பே வந்தனர்கையில் அழைப்பிதழோடு வந்தார்கள்நீங்கள் கல்லூரிக்கு வர முடியாவிட்டால்நாங்கள் உங்கள் வீட்டுக்கு அனைவரும் வந்து விடுகிறோம் என்றார்கள்அனைவருக்கும் எதற்கு அலைச்சல்வேண்டுமென்றால் நான் கல்லூரிக்கு வெளியில் வந்து விடுகிறேனே என்றேன். ‘அது மரியாதையில்லைநாங்களே வந்து விடுகிறோம்’ என்றார்கள்.








மாலை மூன்று மணிக்கு மேல் வருகிறோம் என்றார்கள்அதன்படி வந்தார்கள்சின்ன வீடு … அட்ஜஸ்ட் செய்து உட்கார வைத்தேன்சின்னப் பசங்களாகப் பார்த்ததுகால் நூற்றாண்டுகளுக்கு மேல் ஆகிவிட்டதே…. எல்லோரும் எங்கெங்கு என்னவாக இருக்கிறார்கள் என்று சொன்னார்கள்நான் அதிகமாக மாறவில்லை என்றார்கள் – தொப்பையைத் தவிர. (ஆக அப்போதேஅவர்கள் மாணவர்களாக இருந்த போதே நான் ஒரு ‘வங்கிழடாக’ இருந்திருப்பேன் போலும்! )





 ஒரு ”பையன்” .. அப்போது நான் வைத்திருந்த ஜாவா பைக் பற்றிக் கேட்டான்(ர்). இன்னொரு “பையன்” என் ஜோல்னா பைகயிற்றில் தொங்கும் மூக்குக் கண்ணாடி,ஜிப்பா என்று தொடர்ந்தான்(ர்). இன்னொரு ”பையனுக்கு” இன்னொரு  ஆசைஎன்னை ஜீன்ஸில் அன்று பார்த்தது போல் இன்றும் பார்க்க வேண்டும் என்றான்(ர்). ’நான் கிராமத்திலிருந்து வந்தவன்உங்களை அப்போது ஜீன்ஸில் பார்த்தது போல் பார்க்க வேண்டும் என்றான்(ர்). உடை மாற்றிக் கொண்டேன்ஒரு மாணவன், “எல்லா தேர்வுகளிலும் நான் பிட் அடிப்பேன்உங்கள் supervisionல் மட்டும் நான் பிட் அடிக்கவில்லை” என்று  சோகமாகச் சொன்னான்(ர்).








 நான் இவர்களுக்கு முதலாண்டும்மூன்றாமாண்டும் வகுப்பு எடுத்திருக்கிறேன்என் வழக்கம் முதல் ஆண்டில் கொஞ்சம் ‘உதார்’ காண்பித்தும்மூன்றாமாண்டு  இறுதி செமஸ்டரில் அதிகத் தோழமையுடன் இருப்பது வழக்கம்ஆனால் முதலாண்டில் என் உதாரில் கொஞ்சம் பயந்து போய் ஒரு பட்டப் பெயர் வைத்தார்களாம்பெயரையும் சொன்னார்கள் – அதுவும் என் துணைவியாரிடம்வைத்த பெயர் – சிங்கம். (ஓரளவு இந்தப் பெயரை வைத்து இரண்டு மூன்று நாளைக்கு வீட்டில் ‘உதார்’ காண்பித்துக் கொள்ளலாம்!)

ஒரு cameraman வேற வந்திருந்தார்என்னோடும்துணைவியாருடனும் படங்கள் எடுத்தோம்.  சில மணித்துளிகள் என்றாலும் அன்பால் நிறைந்திருந்த நேரம் அது.


அழகான கைக்கெடிகாரம் அன்பளிப்பாகக் கொடுத்தார்கள்கைக்கெடிகாரத்தில் 85 ZOO என்று போட்டிருந்ததுகைத்தொலை பேசி வந்த பிறகு கைக்கெடிகாரம் அணிவது ஏறத்தாழ இல்லாமல் போயிற்றுஇருந்தாலும் இன்று காலை போட்டோ எடுக்கக் கையில் கட்டினேன்அதன் பின் இப்போது வரை கழட்ட மனமில்லை
அதோடு 85 ZOO என்று போட்டு விட்டார்களேஅதன் மதிப்பே மாறி விட்டதுஇப்போதே அந்தக் கைகெடிகாரத்திற்கு 31 ஆண்டு வயதாகி விட்டதே
The watch has got a great antique value now itself!


அவர்கள் பேசிய ஒவ்வொரு வார்த்தைகளும் எனக்குப் பெருமை சேர்த்தனஎன்னைத் தேடி என் வீட்டிற்கே அனைவரும் வந்தது மிகுந்த நெகிழ்ச்சியைக் கொடுத்ததுபூரிப்படைய வைத்தது.


வாத்தியார்களுக்குத் தான் தெரியும் … பழைய மாணவர்கள் அவர்களைச் சந்திக்க வந்து, பழைய பக்கங்களைப் புரட்டும் போது ஏற்படும் பெருமிதம் எவ்வளவு என்பது!






*

Friday, March 11, 2016

A 200 - YEAR OLD CONNECTION







*


Rev. Daniel Poor


It was at a dinner the other night, when someone wondered why an eminent industrialist from Madurai had gone to Madras Christian College instead of American College in Madurai, that it suddenly struck me that the American missionary presence in this part of the world is 200 years old this year, causing me to interject with a non sequitur. The American Ceylon Mission sank roots in Jaffna not long after the Rev. Daniel Poor and his wife arrived in Colombo on March 22, 1816 together with two other missionary couples and a bachelor clergyman.

Poor opened the first American­run school in this part of the world when on December 9, 1816 he opened the Common Free School, now Union College, in Tellippalai, Jaffna. Seven years later, in Vaddukkoddai, Jaffna, he established another school that was to become the renowned Jaffna College from where came the first two graduates of the University of Madras (Miscellany, August 9, 2004 and October 29, 2012).

 It was amongst the second batch of American missionaries to Jaffna that there arrived Dr. John Scudder, said to be the first medical missionary in the world. After working in Jaffna from 1820 to 1836, Scudder, the grandfather of the legendary Ida Scudder of Vellore, was moved to Madras where he established the American Madras Mission that year. He was to move to Vellore in 1841 and found the American Arcot Mission there.

 But before the move to Madras, the Revs. Levi Spaulding, Henry Hoisington and William Todd and three Jaffna Tamil students (as translators) visited Madura in January 1834 to establish the American Madura Mission. They soon established two schools there but it was left to Poor, who moved to Madura arts, culture and entertainment history TOPICS in 1835, to found 37 schools in the district, including the one that became American College, Madura. He was its first Principal. He returned to Jaffna in 1850 and died there in the cholera epidemic of 1855. On June 28, 1915, one of the finest libraries in South India, the Daniel Poor Memorial Library, was opened in his memory. Its splendid new building, opened in 1926, was funded by a grand­daughter of Poor.

 The close connections between the American Missions in Jaffna, Madura and Vellore (the Madras Mission gave way to the numerous British missions then moving in) led to the development of Kodaikanal as an important hill station (Miscellany, September 4, 2000). A connection with Madras, however, remains. The American Ceylon Mission, being a constituent of a union of congregational churches in South India, is part of the Church of South India, headquartered in Madras from 1947.


 *****

 Jesse Mitchell’s charger 

 My ever­regular correspondent in Australia, Dr. A. Raman, having seen that unique picture of the Museum Tower (Miscellany, February 29) sends me another picture — but this, though many may have seen its focus in situ in the Madras Museum, I feature because it has a story to tell. It may be considered a memorial to the man who could well be considered the founder of the Connemara Public Library, one of India’s four national libraries, Capt. Jesse Mitchell. Raman had received this picture and the one believed to be that of Jesse Mitchell as well as other information about him from Chrissy Hart whose brother had been researching their descent from Mitchell.

 Another of those Irishmen to join the East India Company’s Army, Mitchell arrived in Madras in 1829 and was immediately sent to the Pallavaram cantonment. He records an abiding memory of his first days there spent in regaining his land­legs. During those days meant for rest and recuperation, he and fellow newcomers went through “the terrible ordeal of drinking a strong dose of salts and senna every alternate day for six days, (while) formed up in line in the presence of the doctor”. On the last day “we were informed that the salt junk eaten on board for 3 months was washed clean out of us, and we were now fit for our exile in India for 21 years, when we would be entitled to a pension and allowed to go back to our mother”. They were then posted to various regiments, Mitchell being sent to join the Madras Horse Artillery in Bangalore.

 While Mitchell was seeing action in China and different parts of India, the Madras Museum was inaugurated in January 1851 with Dr. Edward Balfour in charge. It was born through the efforts of the Madras Literary Society which petitioned the East India Company in November 1843, approval being given in 1846. After being located in the upper floors of the College of Fort St. George (Egmore) it moved into the nucleus of its present premises, The Pantheon, in 1853.

Why, when Balfour retired, Mitchell was chosen to take charge of the Museum cannot be explained, unless you take into account a couple of papers he wrote, ‘On the Influence of Local Altitude on the Burning of the Fuses of Shells’ and ‘Description of a Plain or Waxed paper Process in Photography’. Whether those papers justify the explanation that he was appointed part­time supervisor of the Museum because of his interests in microscopy and Natural Science is debatable. But once he was there he did a remarkable job. He acquired a variety of small fauna, shells and fossils from foreign museums in exchange for specimens from the Madras Presidency, started a collection of old coins and medals, and added to Balfour’s Amaravati collection of sculptures. In all he added over 72,000 specimens to the Museum’s collection before he passed away in 1872. One of those specimens that he added to the Zoology Gallery was the skeleton of the horse seen in my picture today, his regimental charger.

But perhaps the most significant thing he did was write to the Government in 1860 urging it to fund a library: “A few hundred rupees, judiciously expended every year, would place before the public a library of reference that would in the course of time be an honour to the Government.” His wish was fulfilled in 1862, when Government funding enabled the opening of a small library in June that year. This library evolved into the Connemara Library. Initially the library was supervised by the Museum, but in 1939, Dr. F.H. Gravely, the last British Superintendent of the Museum, had the Library separated from the Museum, each with its own head.

 Of Mitchell, still very much a part of Madras in St. George’s Cemetery, it was said, “He had very clear ideas of the functions of Museums; first to contain as complete a collection as possible of the natural production of the country and other parts of the world, duly named and systematically arranged as a means of encouraging the study of Natural History, and secondly, to do its share in the advance of Science.” Advancement of knowledge he saw through libraries — and made it happen. That was perhaps a more memorable an achievement of his than all his splendid work for the Museum.


 *****


 Setting things straight 

 My Irish visitor Aine Edwards writes to tell me that some of my detailing in the item on Sr. Loreto (Miscellany, February 22) needs correction and she clarifies that the Little Lambs School in Perambur “is a multi­denominational school with Christian moral teaching” and that it was founded by Maria Gislen, not Sr. Loreto. Aine Edwards had volunteered at the school and was introduced by a mutual friend to Sr. Loreto of the Presentation Order who has been “based mainly in Madras”.

My correspondent, quoting Sr. Loreto, says that the names of the first Presentation nuns to arrive in Madras were not those listed by the publication with which the Irish Embassy was associated. Then citing a website of the Presentation Order they gave me two names on my list as well as Mother Frances Xavier Curran, instead of Xavier Kearney, and a Miss Josephine Fitzsimon instead of a Johanna Fitzgerald. The website does not list Ignatius Healy. I also learnt that the Kellys we both listed died of cholera, Regis in 1844 and Martha 18 months later.

 But as usual I wonder about the accuracy of some of the material on the worldwide web. This time, the site Aine Edwards refers me to, says those first nuns moved to “what was once Robert Clive’s office, now to be the first Presentation Convent in India”. I can hardly imagine either of the Clives, Robert or son Edward, having an office in Black Town or the Catholics being given space in the Fort after 1749!

The information sent to me also indicates that the Presentation Order went beyond education in India. They helped with healthcare. In 1928, they staffed the railway hospital in Golden Rock (Trichy), in 1933 they established a hospital in Theni, and they opened a hospital at Manapad on the Fisheries Coast.



*



Wednesday, December 16, 2015

A "VIS - A - VIS" - Prof V.SRINIVASAN & Prof. Dr. AR. VENKITARAMAN






*


In the year 1963 I and K. Srinivasan, a lecturer in Chemistry of the College were at NCC OTS (Officers Training School, Kamptee, near Nagpur) undergoing our pre-commission training to become NCC officers of our College. A fellow trainee from a College in North India who got to know us well during those three months was curious about how the two of us (Hindu - Brahmins) could be working in a Christian College. I had to tell him that The American College is much different from many Christian Colleges in India. Besides its location in a predominantly Muslim area - Gorippalayam - with majority of students and faculty were Hindus. I told him that we were both students of the College. A special feature in the College is the dome of the College chapel shaped almost like (in shape and size) the dome of the mosque in Goripalayam the cross replacing the crescent as the only difference. 

In the year 1952 when I was in the second year in the College many of the Heads of the Departments were non-Christians - Prof. V. Subramaniam (English), Prof. Karnega Konar (Tamil), Prof. T. Natarajan (Mathematics), Prof. N.R. Krisshnamurthy Iyer (Physics), Prof. P.S. Lakshinarayanan (Chemistry). Mr. C. R. Narayanaan (Botany), Mr. P. Vanchinathan (Hindi), Mr. Gopala Pillai (Malayalam) were the senior most or the only members of their department. 

The Vice-Principal and Professor of Logic & Psychology Prof. Devaraj G Paul, the Head of the Departments of Economics and History Prof. C I Philip and the Librarian Mr. Solomon Physical Director Mr. John S Edward were the only Christians. 

This situation changed gradually and when I retired from the College in the year 1994 I and Prof. P S Srinivasan were the only two non-Christian Heads of the Department of PG and UG Physics in the College.. 

A small digression: Prof. Karmegha Konar used to ride to the College in his chauffer driven bullock cart that used to be parked near the Faculty room. Another interesting feature about him is three generations in his family, he, his son Prof. Krishnan and grandson Prof. K..Elango had served the college in the same department. 

The PG Chemistry Department is unique in its own way: Prof. M. Lakshmanan was the first Head of the Department. After his contract period was over Prof. P S Laksshminarayan was holding fort for a short time as the Cpllege tried three others (one from overseas, two from Kerala) as Heads of Department but they all lasted for short periods. I am sorry I don't now remember their names. The position was given to Dr. Mohamed Sheriff. who held the fort as Additional Professor-in-charge of the Department till Dr. A R Venkitaraman returned from overseas. When Dr. Venkitaraman retired Prof. C B Jawhar Singh was the Head of the Department. He was followed by Dr. P M Sundaram and Prof. Narayanan. 

The Department was thus ruled by Hindus and a Muslim for more number of years than Christians! 

Why I recall these is the secular nature of the College should not be forgotten. 

 V.Srinivasan.


A small addition: In para 2 after the name of Prof. P>S>Lakshminarayanan please add: Prof. S.R. Mallikarjunan(Commerce). 

Thanks 

 VS 

--------------------- ---------------



 Dear VS, 

I enjoyed reading what your active mind has dug up now from American College's history to discover it to have been a Christian institution of secular virtues, secular here in a positive, not pejorative, sense. 

Since you and I joined American College in the same year (1951), we are both privy to facts of the College then and thereafter. So I hope that I can make some corrections in the facts as remembered by you: 

1) Prof. Karmega Konar had retired in 1951 and his son, Mr. K.A.Krishnan, had forthwith joined his father's Department as a Lecturer while Prof.Jothimuthu had taken over the Headship. 

2) Prof.Mallikarjunan was the Professor-in-charge of the Commerce Department. I don't find his name mentioned in your write-up. 

3) Was not Prof. K.J.Joseph the Head of Zoology when we joined in 1951? If so, his name has to be added in the second paragraph. 

4) Prof.P.S.Lakshminarayanan opted for voluntary retirement in 1959 and so was not with the College when Prof.Lakshmanan retired in 1965 or so (?). 

5) Prof.C.B.J.Singh was followed by Prof.Stanley Edward, Prof.Narayanan, Prof.A.S.Rajendran and Prof.Thomas Jeya Bose as P.G.Heads of Chemistry before Prof.P.M.Sundaram's turn came. But I understand the context for your omission of the names that I have resurrected. 


With kind regards and greetings of the season to you and Raji, 


 Venki